Is Geese Singular or Plural

By | May 24, 2022
  • Forums

  • Gretsch Discussion Pages

  • Fred’s Barcalounge

You are using an out of date browser. It may not display this or other websites correctly.
You should upgrade or use an alternative browser.

Singular and plural


  • Thread starter
    Winnie Thomas

  • Start date

Winnie Thomas


  • #1
We currently live in SE AZ and Sandhill cranes come here by the thousands this time of the year.

That lead to thinking about all those years in Northern New England with Geese and Moose a plenty.

Well, if “Goose” is singular, and “Geese” is plural, then why is “Moose” Singular and “Meese” not plural?

I mean for example: Mouse – Mice, Louse – Lice

pmac11


  • #2
English was cobbled together over time from several other languages, so it’s structure is neither logical nor consistent. For example, Moose is a word borrowed from indigenous North Americans in the 1600s.
https://www.etymonline.com/word/moose

wabash slim


  • #4
y’all – all y’all – singular and plural and I learned that on this forum;)

Youse guys, yinz, you-uns—all plural.
Y’all is singular, all y’all is plural.

Like moose, aircraft is both singular and plural.

ramjac


  • #5
A moose once bit my sister.

BBCDC89A-10C3-41F6-895B-EA9276BCF164.jpeg

mschafft


  • #6
Linguistic structure seldom treats exceptions as rules.

KaHOnas


section2


  • #8
I mean for example: Mouse – Mice, Louse – Lice

I propose that the plural of “house” should be “hice.” All in favour?

section2


  • #9
When my kids were toddlers, I often found myself needing to know the plural of “tantrum.” It was definitely not “tantra.”

As my wife observed, “tantra is what got us into this mess!”

drmilktruck


  • #10
We currently live in SE AZ and Sandhill cranes come here by the thousands this time of the year.

That lead to thinking about all those years in Northern New England with Geese and Moose a plenty.

Well, if “Goose” is singular, and “Geese” is plural, then why is “Moose” Singular and “Meese” not plural?

I mean for example: Mouse – Mice, Louse – Lice

Brian Regan on “moosen.” Starts around 1:30

drmilktruck


  • #11
When my kids were toddlers, I often found myself needing to know the plural of “tantrum.” It was definitely not “tantra.”

As my wife observed, “tantra is what got us into this mess!”

spittake.jpg

Runamok


  • #12
Youse guys, yinz, you-uns—all plural.
Y’all is singular, all y’all is plural.

Like moose, aircraft is both singular and plural.

When referring to people ostensibly suffering from the mythical & elusive MPD, does one use the singular, or plural?


Then, there is
“species.”

juks


  • #13
English is a language that is easy to learn on basic level but extremely difficult to master fully. Funnily my language is exactly the opposite. One of the most difficult to learn at all but we only have one exception.

wabash slim


  • #14
When referring to people ostensibly suffering from the mythical & elusive MPD, does one use the singular, or plural?


Then, there is
“species.”

MPD? Moped? Modern political discourse? My pretty dog?

drmilktruck


  • #15
Not wanting to wade into culture wars but there’s some persons who chose to be identified as they.

drmilktruck


  • #16
MPD? Moped? Modern political discourse? My pretty dog?

Multiple Personality Disorder, a controversial psychiatric disorder

wabash slim


  • #17
Multiple Personality Disorder, a controversial psychiatric disorder

Personally, I’m enjoying it.

loudnlousy


  • #18
I`ll better spare you the irregularities and un-logical twists of my native-toungue, folks….

afire


  • #19
MPD? Moped? Modern political discourse? My pretty dog?

I’m fairly certain it stands for Madison Police Department.

I`ll better spare you the irregularities and un-logical twists of my native-toungue, folks….

Well, your native tongue is largely responsible for mine’s weirdness. If you’ve never heard old English, to a native English speaker, it sounds a lot more like German than English. I wonder, to a native German speaker, does it sound more like English, or German gibberish, or neither?




afire


  • #20
English is a language that is easy to learn on basic level but extremely difficult to master fully.

Considering that most native English speakers haven’t mastered it fully, I don’t doubt it.

  • Forums

  • Gretsch Discussion Pages

  • Fred’s Barcalounge

Is Geese Singular or Plural

Source: https://www.gretsch-talk.com/threads/singular-and-plural.214386/

Popular:   Beautiful Inside and Out Meaning