She Needs Some Milk Meaning

By | May 24, 2022

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[Grammar]
There is milk/ There is some milk

  • Thread starter
    angelene001

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  • #1

When I write about an unspecified, uncountable noun, is it necessary to use “some”?

1.There is some milk in the fridge.
2.There is milk in the fridge.

Is there a difference in meaning between 1 and 2?

The same problem with:
1. There isn’t any milk in the fridge.
2. There isn’t milk in the fridge.

Is “any” necessary?

emsr2d2


  • #2

When I write about an unspecified, uncountable noun, is it necessary to use “some”?

1.There is some milk in the fridge.
2.There is milk in the fridge.

Is there a difference in meaning between 1 and 2?

The same problem with:
1. There isn’t any milk in the fridge.
2. There isn’t milk in the fridge.

Is “any” necessary?

There is no real difference between the first two.
“Any” is necessary, in my opinion. While “There isn’t milk in the fridge” would be understandable, we would say either “There isn’t any milk in the fridge” or “There’s no milk in the fridge”.

  • #3

When I write about an unspecified, uncountable noun, is it necessary to use “some”?

1.There is some milk in the fridge.
2.There is milk in the fridge.

Is there a difference in meaning between 1 and 2?

The same problem with:
1. There isn’t any milk in the fridge.
2. There isn’t milk in the fridge.

Is “any” necessary?

No, you do not need to say ‘some’. However it does leave the sentence fairly ambiguous.

With the last two sentences, there is no difference. They both have the same meaning, implying ‘there isn’t any milk’.

5jj


  • #4

No, you do not need to say ‘some’. However it does leave the sentence fairly ambiguous.

In what way do you find it ambiguous?

  • #5

In what way do you find it ambiguous?

People interpret ‘some’ in different ways, depending on the context. Honestly, if somebody said to me ‘there is some milk in the fridge’ I’d immediately think there isn’t much, and I need to buy some.

BobK


  • #6

There is no real difference between the first two.

:up: – except that the first
can
be used to imply ‘…but not very much’ – by putting stress on the ‘some’, as Haniball has said. The stress doesn’t need to be heavy to carry this implication – /sǝm/ => an unspecified amount, /sʌm/ => not very much.

b

Last edited:

5jj


  • #7

Honestly, if somebody said to me ‘there is some milk in the fridge’ I’d immediately think there isn’t much, and I need to buy some.

I’d think that if, as Bob suggested, the word ‘some’ were stressed. When ‘some’ is unstressed, I agree with ems; I find no real difference between the question with ‘some’ and the one without.

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She Needs Some Milk Meaning

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