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How to Spell Tye Dye

By | May 26, 2022

Dying vs. Dyeing

A reader sent me this example of the incorrect use of
dying
for
dyeing:

This term [technicolor] was coined by the company of the same name, and the trademarked term described the company’s process of dying film to create a color print from black-and-white originals, replacing the time-consuming hand-coloring method.

Mixing up the verbs
dye
and
die
and their participles
dyeing
and
dying
in modern English is comical, but before the nineteenth century, the spelling distinctions were not always observed. For example, in his dictionary (1755), Dr. Johnson (1709-1784) spelled the words for both meanings as
die. Joseph Addison (1672-1719), on the other hand, rendered both words as
dye.

Nowadays, however, the spellings
die
and
dying
are reserved for the sense of “cease/ceasing to live,” while
dye
and
dyeing
have to do with coloring or staining something.

The words are often the source of punning. For example, the headline, “Dyeing to Succeed” refers to dyeing one’s hair in the attempt to overcome age discrimination in the workplace.

A common expression with the word dye is “dyed-in-the-wool,” meaning “unchangeable in one’s feelings or beliefs,” for example,

Never ever get involved with a dyed-in-the-wool feminist.

Fran Klein, a dyed-in-the-wool Democrat, voted for Barack Obama in 2008.

Frederick Douglass [said] “I am a Republican, a black, dyed-in-the-wool Republican…”

I am a dyed-in-the-wool, diehard, 1000-percent Trekkie, and I say Trekkie, not Trekker, and I don’t care what the nomenclature has become. –Akiva Goldsman

The expression comes from the fact that when dye is applied to a substance in its raw state, such as wool before it is spun, the resulting color is deeper and more lasting.

The dyeing process produced another expression, more commonly heard in earlier times, but not entirely defunct: “scoundrel of the deepest dye,” meaning, “an out-and-out rogue.”

You have proved yourself a scoundrel of the deepest dye, by maliciously interfering in matters which do not in the least concern you, to the detriment of some of our citizens.” –from a letter addressed to Hamilton Wilcox Pierson (1817-1888)

The man with the good personality may be a scoundrel of deepest dye, and the one with no personality may have the strongest character of the lot. –from a handbook for Christian missionaries (1954)

At other times, when he [Rudolph Valentino] portrayed a scoundrel of the deepest dye, he was made up to look quite repellent –from a 2003 feature in The Guardian

The distinction between
die/dying
and
dye/dyeing
is firmly established in modern usage, so you will want to avoid such gaffes as, “When did Eminem die his hair black?”

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How to Spell Tye Dye

Source: https://www.dailywritingtips.com/dying-vs-dyeing/

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