I Would Love Too Meaning

By | May 26, 2022

  • #2

What about i’m looking forward to seeing you tomorrow?

I wouldnt choose any of them. Of course that’s only my opinion. Wait for more.

Take care.

  • #4

yeap. To is a preposition, therefore, next verb MUST be in gerund.

  • #9

I remember when I studied basic English back in school there was a difference between using the infinitive and the gerund in some cases.

The gerund would denote frequence whereas the infinitive would denote something more specific in time:

Infinitive: I’d like to swim —> “I’d like to do it now”

Gerund: I’d like swimming —-> “I’d like to learn to swim, or to do it frequently”

I’m not sure if I chose good examples to express mysellf, but is what I said true?

  • #10

Hello everybody, I’m new at these great WR forums (and very
excited
about
participating
in
them, not only reading but writing as well now)

I had a doubt while I was sending a text message to a british friend of mine, we were going to see eachother the day after.
So my first question would be: what sentence is the correct one? (in that case)

1) I would love to see you tomorrow
or
2) I would love seeing you tomorrow

Thank you !!! You guys are awesome!!!

If you
already
have a plan to see your friend, I would say:
I am looking foward to seeing you tomorrow.
(It would also be correct to say “I look forward to seeing you tomorrow” but that sounds more formal, like something you would say in an email at work.)
Other options:
I am excited about seeing you tomorrow./ I am excited to see you tomorrow.

If you don’t already have a plan to see your friend, but would like to make one, I would say:
I would love to see you tomorrow./ It would be nice to see you tomorrow. etc…
“I would love seeing you tomorrow” sounds unnatural to me.

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Saludos:)

  • #11

Weeeeellllllll…
I guess being a native does not guarantee a right answer, although you almost did, wordweasel.
The reason why “look forward to” needs a gerund is becuse of the preposition “to”. OK.
But the reason why “play” in “I like to play” is not a gerund is that it is an infinitive, a full infinitive, an infinitive with “to”. In that case “To” is not a preposition but part of the infinitive itself…
I thought I was going to clarify things and maybe I´ve just made them harder to unserstand.
Cheers

Wordweasel did not almost, she gave a precisely correct answer.

1. Many verbs or verb phrases such as look forward to exist and are referred to as verb preposition combinations, just as he indicated.

2. Word weasel did not say that the “to” in “like to play” was a preposition, you added that. Wordweasel correctly said that like does not have an infinitive attached, consequently does not have to be followed by a gerund.

Here’s a helpful link that discusses this:

http://www.uazone.org/friends/esl4rus/ingform.html

Welcome to the forum, Weasel, you’ll have lots of fun and learn a tremendous amount.

Last edited:

NewdestinyX


  • #12

Weeeeellllllll…
I guess being a native does not guarantee a right answer, although you almost did, wordweasel.
The reason why “look forward to” needs a gerund is becuse of the preposition “to”. OK.
But the reason why “play” in “I like to play” is not a gerund is that it is an infinitive, a full infinitive, an infinitive with “to”. In that case “To” is not a preposition but part of the infinitive itself…
I thought I was going to clarify things and maybe I´ve just made them harder to understand.
Cheers

Kidika’s ‘tweek’ of Wordweasel’s explanation is the correct one. So in the original question of this thread — both are perfectly correct and common. Though the ‘love to see’ begs for a ‘point in time’ to be mentioned next…

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I would love to see you (tomorrow/next week/this afternoon)

–where “I would love seeing you” leaves the meeting time ‘very open ended’ and not pertinent to the discussion..

love to see (at some point)
love seeing (in general )

That’s the only nuance I can sense between the two.

Grant

NewdestinyX


  • #14

Also, as far as NewdestinyX’s comment is concerned, I have to say that “I would love seeing you” sounds strange to me. That’s not to say it’s incorrect, of course, but I can’t envision saying it. I would always say “I would love to see you.” But that’s just personal preference, I guess.

Agreed.. “…love seeing you..” would be a distant 2nd choice.. But as the following will show you.. “would love seeing you” is far from an odd choice of words.

Web
Results
1

10
of about
1,710
for
“would love seeing you”.

NewdestinyX


  • #18

The -ing form is not usually used when there’s a WOULD. It sounds weird.
:)

Not convinced this is correct. It is perfect English to my ears and I see it in print too.

Grant

Last edited:

NewdestinyX


  • #19

3. The structure “would love” is always followed by “to”.

So, from rules 2 and 3, you have no choice but say “I would love to see you tomorrow”.

Can you offer an authored source on this rule? I don’t see it in any of my English grammar books. I agree that ‘to’ after ‘would love’ seems to flow off my tongue pretty naturally — there is nothing at all offensive to my ear about ‘would love seeing/working with, etc.. you..” Having a hard time believing it’s a rule. ‘to work’ certainly wins out on Google — but — “would love working with” — incorrect grammar???

Web
Results
1

10
of about
11,600
for “would love working”

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Web
Results
1

10
of about
6,310,000
for
“would love
to work

Thanks,
Grant

NewdestinyX


  • #22

Grant, My Rule 3 is my interpretation of the “rule” applicable to “would like”, when this expression means ‘wish’ or ‘want’. For me, ‘would love’ is just a more emphatic way of saying “would like”, and I assume that the same rules apply for both expressions. The statement, “Note that ‘would like’ means ‘wish’ or ‘want’ and is always followed by the infinitive” comes from Practical English Usage, Michael Swan. I have quite a few grammar books myself, but none of them has expressions such as “would love +verb-ing”, or “would like + verb-ing”.

Thanks Zetem.. I was wondering if it was Swan you were quoting. He tends to be on his own in the grammar world on a lot of observations. In my experience he offers a lot more ‘opinion’ than others and draws some artificial conclusions that are more about a ‘style’ he prefers than the more orthodox grammar precedents. I think Betty Azar, Oxford, New American Standard all have grammar sources that are more in keeping with the ‘hard fast’ ‘rules’. And then there’s “what people actually say” compared to “what’s correct” which is the age old ‘prescriptive versus descriptive’ thing.

Also just because an example doesn’t appear doesn’t mean it’s not correct or our grammar books would be pretty thick (even more than they are). But to your challenge I will go looking ‘gerund’ uses up again in my resources. I prefer to speak using the prescriptive rules especially in teaching and forum settings like this. There are so many students of English watching our English usage.

I maintain that at least amongst several educated speakers I asked — “would love seeing/watching/working…” sounds perfectly normal to them and only a little less common than the same with the infinitive.

Thanks for your thoughts,
Grant

I Would Love Too Meaning

Source: https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/i-would-love-seeing-to-see.993769/